"A New Chapter" - Light Shines Vividly Through Morning Fog, Adirondack Park, New York

This is an image that I've sat on for 2 years. I've always enjoyed looking at the RAW file and remembering that morning. The warmth and intensity of the sun blasting through the morning fog, the way the dew and spiderwebs lit up like little gemstones hidden among the forest, the smell of damp spruce and marshland. Moments like these are so simple, so common in nature, and so completely necessary to experience. I hope that I never take these moments for granted!

"A New Chapter" - Light shines vividly through morning fog in Adirondack Park, New York.

About the image: This image seems straight forward, but there is a bit going on behind the scenes. I took note of the prominent tree tops and ensured that they appeared evenly spaced, while also not coming too close to the edges of the frame where they would have given the image a truncated appearance. I also ensured that the beams of light through the fog started in the top right and shone down diagonally to the left. For the exposure, I made sure to not let the highlights of the leaves clip and blow out, and let the shadow fall wherever it wanted. I increased the contrast slightly during post processing, but otherwise did little to the image.

Techs: Canon 50D, Canon 70-200 f/4 @ 135mm. 1/40 second, f/13, ISO 100. Polarizer. Tripod.

"More Than Ghosts" - Morning Sun Reflected in the Ausable River, Adirondack Park, New York

In a way, this image is a ghost still lingering from a distant trip to the Adirondacks 2 years ago. Like a lost loved one, it will always remain with me. This was a journey of hardship and growth. Just outside Saratoga Springs at highway speed, my vehicle was struck by a tractor trailer. As I veered off the road, time stood still. I watched every bit of glass break around me like an oddly peaceful silent movie. My car rolled twice and finally came to rest. Gathering my senses, I crawled out and realized that my body was still in tact. I guess you could say that I was lucky. Determined to continue, I asked the police officer to drop me off at the local Enterprise to rent a vehicle and continue my trip. It would have been easy to go home. Hell, it would have made sense to go home. Sense, however, was the last thing I had or desired after surviving that ordeal. I wanted to live life to my fullest possibility. I wanted to connect to nature in my raw emotional state. I took nothing for granted. I grew as a photographer, and became a more patient and grateful human. In the end, I am happy that I was able to live through such an experience. It truly changed my perspective.

"More Than Ghosts" - Morning sun reflected in the Ausable River. Adirondack Park, New York.

Techs: Canon 50D, 70-200 f/4 @ 70mm. 1.3 seconds, f/16, ISO 200. Polarizer. Tripod.

"Weary Eyes, Opened Wide" - Sunrise overlooking the High Peaks of the Adirondacks, New York

"One last cast". That's what my uncle Bruce would say when we were out fishing on his boat. That one sentence symbolized his passion for fishing as well as a desire to always keep trying. Sometimes, we would make 20 "last casts". And guess what? During those last casts, we sometimes even caught a fish! Trying just that let us achieve our goal. In photography, too, pushing just a little harder or staying right up until you need to leave is always worthwhile. When I created this image, I had already spent a week in the Adirondacks and to be completely honest, I was exhausted! I was contemplating leaving the night before, but decided to stick around for one for morning. Boy, am I glad that I did. While overlooking this lovely stream meandering through a marsh, leading eventually towards the High Peaks themselves, the sky lit up with gorgeous rays of warm light. Next time you are out on a trip and want to call it quits, try to remember this lesson for yourselves. It isn't always easy, but it's always worth it. Make one last cast.

"Weary Eyes, Opened Wide" - Sunrise over a marsh overlooking the High Peaks. Adirondack Park, New York.

Techs: Canon 50D, Canon 10-22 @ 19mm. 1 second, f/11, ISO 100. Polarizer. Tripod.