"Wintry Womb" - Ice Patterns in Rock Creek Park, Washington D.C.

I've got some great news for you all. I'm having a baby boy at the end of May! I'm so eager to meet the little dude. This image of some ice in a small stream in D.C. reminded me of a womb during this nervous, exciting, and life changing time.

"Wintry Womb" - Ice Patterns in Rock Creek Park, Washington D.C.

About the Image: The main challenge of shooting an image like this is finding a composition that makes sense and flows without feeling truncated. I utilized the main bubble in the center as a focal point, and let the other lines flow outward while being careful to compose the image so that no major bubbles or features were cut off at the edge of the frame. 

Techs: Canon 7D, Canon 70-200 f/4 + 500D Closeup Filter @ 118mm. 2.5 seconds, f/22, ISO 100. Tripod.

"Winter Kaleidoscope" - Ice Patterns with Reflected Sunset Light

Forget about "Snowzilla", I was more excited for the single digit lows a few days before the big storm hit us. I ended up exploring two new locations, Theodore Roosevelt Island, and Rock Creek Park, in search of exciting ice patterns. I don't know how, but every year I stay jazzed up about Capturing new images of ice. It's a bit like a treasure hunt, you never know what you're going to find. 

"Winter Kaleidoscope" - Ice Patterns with Reflected Sunset Light, Rock Creek Park, Washington D.C.

About the Image: I've photographed this particular flavor of ice a few times before. Always from above. Always in shadow. The shapes are cool enough, and make for a decent image of repeating triangles. I strive to move forward creatively, though, and photographing these patterns from the top in flat light just wasn't cutting it. As I moved around the scene photographing other bits of ice, I noticed that the warm light of sunset on a distant hillside was casting some lovely, lively, light onto the ice. Especially so when I placed the camera very low to pick up the reflections. It looked beautiful to my eye, but how could I record this with my camera and keep the depth of field large enough to render the entire scene in focus from such a sharp angle? Not even f/32 resulted in a sharp image, so I decided to do a focus blend. With my lens at f/11, I changed focus slightly over the course of 8 images, from front to back. Later, I utilized Photoshop's focus stacking tool to piece them together into one sharp, perfectly focused frame.

Techs: Canon 7D, Canon 70-200 f/4 + 500D Closeup Filter. 0.3 seconds, f/11, ISO 100. Focus Blend. Tripod.