"Pathways" - A Great Blue Heron Hunting During High Water, Great Falls National Park, Virginia

Hello there! It's been a little while, I know. My healthy and beautiful son, Porter, was born in early June, and while I wish I could say my absence was solely thanks to the hectic adjustment period of having a newborn in the house, that just wouldn't be true. He's the best damn baby ever. Sleeps all night, smiles at his parents, laughs, and drinks milk pretty much all day long. What a life. I guess the truth is that I just haven't been inspired lately. Like a summer drought, my creatives juices had slowed to a trickle. But just upstream, a rainstorm is pouring, and I can feel my artistic soul beginning to re-hydrate. And man, was I thirsty. It's funny how you don't realize what you've been missing sometimes. With autumn just around the corner, I can't wait to get out to my favorite local areas to capture the stunning change from summer, to autumn, to winter. For now, here is an image that I'm extremely excited about. I created this photograph earlier this summer in Great Falls National Park. Every summer shad migrate upstream, and the local great blue herons gather along the banks of these rapids to chow down. 

"Pathways" - A great blue heron attempts to catch Shad and other fish during high water in the Potomac River. Great Falls National Park, Virginia.

About the Image: The unusually high water level during this time of year, this year, led to some new compositional opportunities at a place that I sometimes think I've gotten every possible heron shot at (what a stupid notion). Typically the river along the bottom right side of this image is just dry rocks. Using my 70-200 f/4 with a slow shutter speed while locked down on a tripod, I composed the image where the water flow made an S-curve from top left, to middle right, and finally bottom left. Additionally, I watched the placement of the trees so as not to clip the tree in the top right and to provide enough of an anchor to the tree on the bottom left so that it didn't feel too truncated. Taking several exposures, as I always do when including moving water in the photograph allowed me to pick the image with the best looking water, as well as ensuring that the heron was sharp, as they do occasionally move during the relatively long exposure. A polarizer helped to cut some of the glare on the rocks to provide some more contrast overall in the scene.

Techs: Canon 7D, Canon 400 f/5.6., 1/4th second, f/14, ISO 100. Polarizer. Tripod.